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Useful Information / NHS vaccinations and when to have them

It's important that vaccines are given on time for the best protection, but if you or your child missed a vaccine, contact your GP to catch up.

NHS vaccination schedule

Babies under 1 year old

Age Vaccines
8 weeks 6-in-1 vaccine
Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine
Rotavirus vaccine
MenB
12 weeks 6-in-1 vaccine (2nd dose)
Rotavirus vaccine (2nd dose)
16 weeks 6-in-1 vaccine (3rd dose)
Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine (2nd dose)
MenB (2nd dose)

Children aged 1 to 15

Age Vaccines
1 year Hib/MenC (1st dose)
MMR (1st dose)
Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine (3rd dose)
MenB (3rd dose)
2 to 10 years Flu vaccine (every year)
3 years and 4 months MMR (2nd dose)
4-in-1 pre-school booster
12 to 13 years HPV vaccine
14 years 3-in-1 teenage booster
MenACWY

Adults

Age Vaccines
65 years Pneumococcal (PPV) vaccine
65 years (and every year after) Flu vaccine
70 years Shingles vaccine

Pregnant women

When it's offered Vaccines
During flu season Flu vaccine
From 16 weeks pregnant Whooping cough (pertussis) vaccine

Extra vaccines for at-risk people

Some vaccines are only available on the NHS for groups of people who need extra protection.

Important

If you're starting college or university you should make sure you've already had:

  • the MenACWY vaccine – which protects against serious infections like meningitis. You can still ask your GP for this vaccine until your 25th birthday.
  • 2 doses of the MMR vaccine – as there are outbreaks of mumps and measles at universities. If you have not previously had 2 doses of MMR you can still ask your GP for the vaccine.

Speak to your GP surgery if:

  • you think you or your child have missed any vaccinations
  • you or your child have a vaccination appointment – but you've missed it or cannot attend

They can book or rearrange the next available appointment.

It’s best to have vaccines on time, but you can still catch up on most vaccines if you miss them.